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NEW PAPER – In between two worlds: Colombian migrants negotiating identity, acculturation, and settlement in Melbourne

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New paper in Qualitative Research by CIDRN by Margarita Fierro Hernandez and Christopher C. Sonn

Abstract

Latin American immigration experiences have been documented in terms of acculturation, settlement and belonging. While there is an increase in research interest, there is a need to recognise the diversity of the Latin American region, as well as within countries, in terms of culture, history, and histories of colonialism. This exploratory qualitative work examines the experiences of 15 Colombian immigrants living in Melbourne, Australia and considers implications for identity, acculturation and settlement. Thematic analysis of in depth-interviews generated three themes that represent their acculturation and settlement: identity negotiation between home and homeland, constructing Colombian identity in Australia and navigating barriers to settlement. Migration was mainly experienced as a loss and represented as a negotiation between home country and host country where the structures of support were crucial in making home in Australia. This has shed light on the meanings, expectations and challenges associated with the migration process to Australia. This analysis reveals how accents, cultural values, and discrimination play a role in the ways Colombians construct and negotiate identity and settlement in Australia.

Citation

Hernandez, M. F., & Sonn, C. C. (2019). In between two worlds: Colombian migrants negotiating identity, acculturation, and settlement in Melbourne Australia. The Australian Community Psychologist, 30(1), 65-80.

Link to Full Article

NEW PAPER – A Psychosocial Study of Guilt and Shame in White South African Migrants to Australia

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New paper in Qualitative Psychology by CIDRN researchers Gavin Ivey and Chris Sonn titled “A Psychosocial Study of Guilt and Shame in White South African Migrants to Australia”.

Abstract

Despite recent research interest in migrant psychology, little attention has been paid to the emotional reactions of guilt and shame resulting from migrants’ decisions to leave their homeland. Universalist theories have yielded to an understanding of emotions as culturally contextualized and interpersonally constituted phenomena. For reasons associated with South Africa’s racial history and the social dynamics following the 1994 transition to democracy, some White migrants from this country display specific manifestations of guilt and shame related to their migration decision. Using a psychosocial research approach, 14 in-depth interviews were conducted with White South Africans who migrated to Australia following the democratic transition. Explicit and implicit expressions of migration-induced guilt and shame were evident in many research participants. In addition to guilt associated with leaving loved ones to an uncertain future, participants reported complex admixtures of guilt and shame at having been apartheid beneficiaries, internalizing racist attitudes, and “abandoning” their motherland at a critical historical juncture. Disavowed guilt and shame were evident in some participants, indicating defensive efforts to avoid acknowledging and experiencing these painful emotional states.

Online First Publication, April 18, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/qup0000133

Citation

Ivey, G., & Sonn, C. (2019, April 18). A Psychosocial Study of Guilt and Shame in White South African Migrants to Australia. Qualitative Psychology. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/qup0000133

International Conference of Community Psychology

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The ICCP 2020 conference will explore ways to foster and sustain solidarities – through communities, activism, knowledges and environment. Learn about the work of people, agencies, industries, and collaborators who contribute to social change and individual and community wellbeing. The conference will explore their innovative, critical and engaged research, teaching, and practice through the thematic areas of: Knowledges for sustainable futures; Creating inclusive cultures and communities; Working the boundaries; Global dynamics in local expressions.

Visit: Community Psychology at ICCP2020